Hot Guys in Period Costume

Does just what it says on the label

John Thornton 

I think I’ve reblogged this about a billion times, but here it is again. My favorite detail from this still is the pineapple you can see peeking out the basket; can you imagine getting a pineapple in 1854? Poor Mrs. Hale, opening that basket expecting, like, cherries and getting this crazy, spiky devil’s fruit instead? Like, how is one meant to eat this thing?
And where’d Thornton get a pineapple, anyway? 
Updated to add: The pineapple was successfully cultivated in European hothouses from 1720, and (as suggested by its predominance in the decorative arts of the 18th and 19th centuries) came to symoblize any number of things - from the reach of a country’s international power to domestic conviviality. In the US, ’the fruit which was the visual keystone of the feast naturally came to symbolize the high spirits of the social events themselves; the image of the pineapple coming to express the sense of welcome, good cheer, human warmth and family affection inherent to such gracious home gatherings.’ (http://levins.com/pineapple.html)
So Thornton probably got his pineapple from a hothouse, almost surely paid a small fortune for it, and likely intended to deliver it in the spirit of friendship and  hospitality.
And also in the spirit of getting into Margaret’s pants.

John Thornton 

I think I’ve reblogged this about a billion times, but here it is again. My favorite detail from this still is the pineapple you can see peeking out the basket; can you imagine getting a pineapple in 1854? Poor Mrs. Hale, opening that basket expecting, like, cherries and getting this crazy, spiky devil’s fruit instead? Like, how is one meant to eat this thing?

And where’d Thornton get a pineapple, anyway? 

Updated to add: The pineapple was successfully cultivated in European hothouses from 1720, and (as suggested by its predominance in the decorative arts of the 18th and 19th centuries) came to symoblize any number of things - from the reach of a country’s international power to domestic conviviality. In the US, the fruit which was the visual keystone of the feast naturally came to symbolize the high spirits of the social events themselves; the image of the pineapple coming to express the sense of welcome, good cheer, human warmth and family affection inherent to such gracious home gatherings.’ (http://levins.com/pineapple.html)

So Thornton probably got his pineapple from a hothouse, almost surely paid a small fortune for it, and likely intended to deliver it in the spirit of friendship and  hospitality.

And also in the spirit of getting into Margaret’s pants.

(Source: worldofarmitage, via missmorland)

lesliehowardforever:

Leslie Howard is awarded by popular vote with the Picturegoer Gold Medal for the best screen performance of 1935, for his acting in The Scarlet Pimpernel (Picturegoer, September 12, 1936)

lesliehowardforever:

Leslie Howard is awarded by popular vote with the Picturegoer Gold Medal for the best screen performance of 1935, for his acting in The Scarlet Pimpernel (Picturegoer, September 12, 1936)

(via missmorland)